In My Opinion: Life should not revolve around social media

BY CAROLINA BOUCAROLINA managing

MANAGING EDITOR

One year ago, I made a social mistake that changed my life forever.

I thought I was invincible. I thought I could say whatever I wanted to without offending others, or people seeing and realizing it’s about them. I thought there were no consequences as to what I said, regardless of how other people felt. This overpowering feeling, this feeling of superiority and pride, was the reason I was brought down.

One year ago, I applied for an officer position for a club in which I had been active member — and a previous officer of — for all of high school. I did all the work I was asked to do and knew that I would be able to handle a second term. I was passionate and charismatic and I thought those characteristics alone would take me far.

I was wrong. I ended up not getting the position and I was incredibly upset. In a rage, I took to the Twitterverse and posted unnecessary and rude comments about the club and it’s representatives. Because of this, I was removed from my officer position, effective immediately. I also was not allowed to apply for the following year, but I could still be “an active member of the club”. It was a slap in the face and something I still regret one year later.

I never really got the opportunity to apologize, because I was in denial. I refused to admit my erroneous ways, and for the past year, I thought what I did was acceptable and okay. But something I learned is that mistakes are always there and while I may not have thought it was one originally, other people might. As much as I try to skew a story, the screenshots and facts still exist. I messed up.

I finally realized this after I decided to give up my beloved Twitter for Lent. Lent is a religious holiday season where some denominations of Christians either sacrifice something or actively participate in something new in return for intrinsic or extrinsic benefit. I felt like after the tumultuous year I had on social media, giving up my Twitter would be beneficial. I would not have to the urge to tweet about my entire life or bother anyone else.

One thing I learned from giving up Twitter is that it’s especially nice not having to see the world through a series of tweets or my cell phone camera. I learned that I don’t have to limit myself to 140 characters and I can express my feelings through a series of other outlets, something more personal and not worldwide, such as a private diary.

Another thing I have learned is that not everything needs to be published online. Sure, using social media is great for uploading appropriate pictures, sending songs to friends, or even getting to know other students attending the same university as me. But at the same time, social media is not a place for me to complain and cry when I have my family or friends for the same exact reason. Not everyone who follows you on Twitter is your friend.

This experience of not using social media has really helped me to mature as well. In the past month, I have been able to use my phone less and actually have conversations with people without feeling like I have nothing to talk about or wishing I could desperately be online instead of dealing with human interaction.

Life should not be lived through tweets on a timeline or revisiting past mistakes. Life is supposed to be composed of adventures and of stories that I can tell my children when they’re my age. I don’t want to a parent who can only tell my kids that my high school years weren’t as great as they could have been because I couldn’t take my eyes off my phone.

While I made a huge mistake last year, I am grateful it happened. Without it, I would not have experienced a social media “cleanse” and I know that if I didn’t get in trouble now, I would later. Now back on Twitter, I will be – and have been – more cautious with what I post and hopefully other people will learn from my situation.

My biggest fear is that my past situation will affect the outcome of my future. I want to leave high school in high school and not bring this into college with me; hopefully giving myself –and maybe even others – closure. While I matured and realized my error, I also realized whom it impacted most: myself. One year later, I finally feel at ease and now know that social media will definitely not play as big of a role in my life as it had before.

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Opinion: Religion should not serve as bias

morgan comiteBY MORGAN COMITE

ARTS & ENT PHOTO EDITOR

Marilyn Monroe, one of most celebrated actresses, was Jewish. The champion boxer, Mike Tyson, converted to Islam. Actor, Kevin Bacon, is an Atheist. But do we know these people for what religion they believe in? We recognize these people as who they are, not what they believe in.

According to Merriam-Webster, religion is the “belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power.” Because religion has always been a part of the world, it is the foundation of our very existence; however, this should not define a person. It does not guarantee success, good moral character, or level of intelligence. It is a belief, a preference, which is solely ones choice.

While the United States is supposed to be separate from the church, in the Pledge of Allegiance we recite “One Nation, Under God”.  If religion is not supposed to be used in court or education, why does a representation of our country’s patriotism have religious meaning? According to NY Daily News, a Texas high school student was suspended for refusing to recite the Pledge. Why should a student be punished and deprived from the right to education for protesting the Pledge even though our third President, Thomas Jefferson, said there should be “separation of church and state?” Some people may be very observant, where their religion and culture play tremendous parts in their lives.  Others consider themselves Atheist, in which they do not believe in religion at all. Students who feel this way may oppose to reciting the Pledge of Allegiance because it is considered offensive and disrespectful to their beliefs. This should not change a teacher’s impression of a student, nor of the student’s academic abilities.

In addition to this, on college applications and standardized tests there is boxes to check what religion students define themselves as, but their religious beliefs should not even be considered when applying to college. How does a belief impact what kind of work ethic a student has? In particular, Christian applicants can be viewed differently as a result of upsetting feelings toward the religion, which is totally unrelated to academics. Christian students from the Radiation Therapy Program at the Community College of Baltimore County were rejected, failed and expelled for attempting to spread their belief on campus. Under the First Amendment, Americans are given the right to freedom of speech and should not be affected academically by their religious belief.

Muslim Americans have been scrutinized stereotypically as terrorists because of attacks by Islamic terrorist groups like al-Qaeda and ISIS. Although fear of terrorism is rational after events as tragic as the 9/11 attacks, it is unfair to group an entire religion as the enemy based on the actions of individual criminals. The Muslim religion is not the belief or violent attacks and not all Muslims are opposed to American ideology of democracy and capitalism.

Whether you attend church with your parents, or synagogue for the High Holiday seasonreligion plays a role in your everyday life. Although religion is something to believe in and practice, it should not serve as a bias toward others.

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Opinion: College decision letters should be kept traditional

CAROLINA managingBY CAROLINA BOU

MANAGING EDITOR

On Dec. 16, 2015, I sat in Starbucks while studying for my government midterm anxiously awaiting my decision from my dream school, Boston College. The school released on Twitter that they would be delivering acceptance letters through email and as I saw the open tab on my computer change from “Inbox – 0” to “Inbox – 1,” I knew my future was here.

For the last four years, seniors have been preparing for college decisions nationwide and even worldwide. The college application process — which really begins freshman year — is stressful. All the work that we have completed, all the grades we received, and all the finals and midterms we take come to a decision we receive through an email or through an online status check. These results can be generated in seconds.

In a technological era, we are infatuated with the idea of getting our admissions decisions as fast as possible, rather than waiting. Back when my parents were applying to colleges 30 years ago, they had to wait for the admissions letter to come in the mail. Now when I receive my letter, while beautiful, it is not as special because I already checked my decision online.

Because online decisions have been more common, I do not know, and will never know, what it will be like finding my decision through a letter. I always have seen scenes in movies and television where high school seniors will open a letter with anticipation finding out whether they have been accepted or rejected from their dream school. While opening an email may not be as special as ripping open a letter from the mailbox, I’m sure my heart sank just as much as seniors’ hearts sank a couple years ago.

It is inevitable that college decisions will be released online now and in the next few years, and many schools have made this change. Boston College, for example, began emailing decisions this year. Up until last year, the school decided to stay traditional and send all admissions decisions through the mail. Vanderbilt University sent some regular decisions straight through the mail rather than through an online portal. State schools such as the University of Florida and Florida State University sent admissions decisions through an online portal saying “Congratulations! You have been accepted” with the rest of the information coming through the letter in weeks to come.

Online college decisions may not be as exciting, but a decision is still so. I have still been accepted to every single school I applied to so far. Each time, I jumped and screamed and cried just like any other high school senior would have regardless of where he or she saw the decision.

No matter how a decision is released, whether online, through email, or through the post office, an admission decision is something to be proud of — regardless of the result. Never will I forget the moment I opened up my PDF’d letter from Boston College saying, “I am delighted to offer you admission to Boston College,” and while I’m not going there, that feeling is one I will always remember.

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In My Opinion: Senioritis is inevitable after years of stress

EMILY C COLOR EDITOR IN CHIEF yayBY EMILY CHAIET

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

I’m not much of a runner, but I’ve been competing in the longest marathon of my life: high school. As I reach the last semester of my senior year, I see the finish line glistening less than a mile ahead of me, I can hear the cheers of those waiting to see me finish and yet even with such a short distance left, I know it’s not over. I know that these last few yards still matter, but why do I have to run to get there? After three and a half years of working as hard as I possibly could, why is it so bad to walk the rest of the way?

A couple months ago, I was accepted into my dream school, Northwestern University, early decision. Ever since my acceptance, countless friends and family members have asked when I’m going to stop studying for tests and completing my homework. I thought I would never fall victim to the senioritis plague, but every time I crack open a textbook to study for one of the many assessments I have every week, I can’t feel the same motivation that I used to in school. It’s not that I don’t care about my grades anymore, but after three and a half years of endless studying and minimal hours of sleep, there’s not much fuel left in my tank to give my last semester of high school my all.

Now I’m not saying that every senior should get senioritis and I am certainly not encouraging it. However, I think that senioritis is a normal and healthy reaction to years of pressure to build the perfect college resume. Balancing loads of AP classes with extracurricular activities certainly can put a strain on any student.

As more AP and AICE classes are added to the Bay’s curriculum, the stress that students face has built up, and the need for time to relax becomes even more prevalent. A 2009 survey conducted by the American Psychological Association found that nearly half of all teens, about 45 percent, said they were stressed by school pressures. In fact, high school teens have been reported to feel more stressed out than adults. According to “The Huffington Post” while adults rate their stress at a 5.1 on a 10-point scale, teens rate their stress levels at 5.8, which far exceeds the healthy stress level of 3.9.

The amount of stress put on students makes catching senioritis inevitable. It is also reported that 31 percent of teens report feeling overwhelmed as a result of stress, 30 percent say that they feel sad or depressed as a result of stress, and 36 percent report feeling tired or fatigued because of stress.

Of course it is important for seniors to not give up completely. They should still work to pass all the of their classes so that they can maintain their college acceptances and graduate. Seniors shouldn’t just give up on their classes completely and stop doing homework; however, they should spend less time stressing about school and more time enjoying their last few months of high school before they have to leave for college. These last few months should be a time for self-reflection for seniors. It should be a time to avoid the stress of high school while still putting in some effort to get passing grades in their classes.

As I reach the finish line and finish my last few months of high school, I’ve realized that what is most important is being proud of the work that I’ve done. I know not to let senioritis make all those years go to waste; yet I know it’s okay if I don’t put in all of my effort when finishing the rest of high school. It’s been a hard race to run, but I know that even if I walk the rest of the way, I’ll have my head held high and look back on a race I was proud to run.

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In My Opinion: Online gambling websites ruin sport culture

BY EVAN TEICHEVAN TEICH IMO

SPORTS COPY EDITOR

Football has become more than a sport to just watch these days.  While people still sit around the table with food and binge watch games all day on Sundays, they are not just watching to cheer on their favorite team.  They are intrigued by the risk and sometimes reward that comes with the betting aspect of football.  The exchange of money is ubiquitous, especially with the recent creations of one-week fantasy leagues through Fanduel and DraftKings, the driving forces in a multi-billion dollar industry.

These online one week “duels” are becoming increasingly popular among the younger population.  Although the age restriction requires users to be of at least 18 years of age, I don’t think it is effective.  Underage users are common because there is no way to police the age of an online gambler.  Betting in a casino, for example, is monitored by the process of checking and scanning IDs, but with these sites all users have to do is get a hold of mom or dads credit card information, tie it to their account, and agree to a consent saying they are at least 18 years old.  As a matter of fact, I see 8-year-olds walking around with their iPhones drafting their teams and setting weekly lineups.  Do they realize what they are doing?  The answer is no.  I don’t think that today’s generation of kids understand the seriousness and danger of gambling, and these sites are only worsening that problem.

Besides easy access from underage users, there is a major cause for concern regarding scandals, unfair advantages, and the close tie between these sites and the National Football League.  Recently, a DraftKings employee, who had private DraftKings data, won $350,000 in a FanDuel matchup. It is a major issue if people have inside information on how to ultimately win match-ups on the site which leads to them winning money.  These sites can also lead to potential bribing of professionals in order to change outcomes for average people.

Most online gambling is illegal, so the real question is: why are these one-week fantasy leagues legal?  Well, these sites aren’t definitively described as Internet gambling.  Professional leagues are in favor of these sites because it helps to gain more viewers and a larger “fan base.”  Furthermore, big networks are investing in these sites because their stations will get more attention.  It is a win-win for the corporation side of things, but a total loss for the culture of sports.

Sports used to be about cheering for the hometown team, or staying committed as a “die hard” fan, but that has all changed.  Now, people root for the quarterback on one team and the wide receiver on another team.  True fans are gone.  Standard fantasy leagues, such as ESPN were the start of this, but the sudden popularity of one-week fantasy leagues has taken it to a whole new level.  As a result, more than 56 million people in North America will play fantasy sports this year, up from 12 million in 2005.  These sites must be banned.

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In My Opinion: Too much weight placed on tests for college admissions

EMILY C COLOR EDITOR IN CHIEF yayBY EMILY CHAIET

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Malala Yousafzai won a Nobel Peace Prize at age 17 for defending women and children education rights. She is the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate and was was named one of “Time Magazine’s” 100 most influential people in 2013, but if she wants to get into Stanford, she’s going to have to take the SAT’s first.

SAT’s and ACT’s have always played an integral role in the college admission process, yet too much weight is placed on an exam that does not show every student’s ability to succeed in college. There are so many extraordinary students who are deterred from applying to their dream school simply because their SAT score does not meet the requirement, even if their GPA does.

A high GPA shows a student’s commitment to education and the hard work they have put forth in school. On the contrary, most of the time, a high SAT score shows that a student is a naturally gifted genius or that they have the affluence to afford hours of SAT tutoring. Aren’t colleges looking for diligent students? How can one test, provided just once a month for seven months of a year, possibly show a student’s dedication to learning?

The weight of standardized tests is also a financial burden to students and a disadvantage to those of low-income families. More affluent students have an advantage over those who don’t come from money. They can afford to spend thousands of dollars on SAT and ACT tutoring, not to improve their critical thinking skills, but to learn the tricks to get them a high score on the standardized test of their choosing. The standardized test have become just another way for companies such as College Board and ACT to take money from students desperate to get into a good college.

The cost of these standardized tests quickly adds up. Not only do students have to pay more than $20 each time they take an SAT or ACT, they also have to pay a fee to send their scores to the universities of their choosing. On top of this, many students will spend thousands of dollars on tutors due to the importance of these exams. A 2009 report from Eduventures calculated that about 2 million students spend $2.5 billion a year on test preparation and tutoring. Therefore, students with low incomes tend to have lower scores, for they cannot afford the absurd price of SAT and ACT tutoring.

However, some universities have realized the benefit of making test scores optional on their applications. About 850 schools and counting do not require test scores, and this has led them to attract a strong and diverse pool of applicants. It encourages minority students and low-income students to apply to that university. After making test scores optional, Wake Forest University saw an immense change in diversity in their student population. Since making test optional in 2009, their percentage of non-white students has shot up from 18 percent to a now 30 percent.

I believe that every university should allow sending test scores to be optional. There are so many academically talented students who are penalized by their test scores in the college admissions process, whether it be because they cannot afford tutoring and preparation books, or because they are not strong test takers.  The truth is not all students can get a 36 on their ACT while maintaining straight A’s and participating in thousands of extracurricular activities. Yes, the SAT and ACT test do display student’s knowledge, yet weighting them the same as a student’s grades is unfair.

If earning a Nobel Peace Prize at age 17 isn’t enough to get an acceptance into college, then something is clearly wrong with the college admissions system. Yousafzai’s humanitarian work and passion for education should be enough to get her into any university, even without the inclusion of standardized testing scores.

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In my opinion: America’s next president shouldn’t be a politician

BY FRANKI ROSENTHALFRANKI ROSENTHAL COLOR

MULTIMEDIA NEWS EDITOR

Donald Trump is the right person to be president because he isn’t a politician:

Since perhaps Herbert Hoover, who himself served the government as secretary of commerce, every U.S. President has been a politician.  However, public approval polls regularly reflect dissatisfaction with our presidents. A good argument can be made that Americans simply don’t like politicians.

This may also explain the early popularity of non-politicians running for president this year, such as Carly Fiorina and Dr. Ben Carson. Americans are looking for a change in leadership.  They want a president who has the courage to say what needs to be said, is confident in his/her decisions, and has actually accomplished something other than being elected to a public office.

According to Cypercast News Service (CNS news) the polls have shown that Americans are tired of business-as-usual politics.  Americans are done with politicians who say what they think people want to hear merely because it is politically expedient.  Donald Trump isn’t one of those people.  He says what he thinks, regardless of whether it’s a popular position.  The bottom line is you know what you get with Donald Trump: straight talk. Trump speaks to the people, not at the people.  This country needs to feel good about itself and Donald Trump has the ability to motivate people to do just that.

A good leader is someone who is confident and can get the job done.  Anyone can learn to solve problems, communicate or even mentor others.   However, confidence cannot be taught.  Certainly each of our presidents has had their own brand of confidence, but few have displayed confidence to the degree of Donald Trump.  His name brand “Trump” is known by the masses from his successful business, hotels, golf courses and television shows.  Because he is so well known, his confidence is believable while the remaining candidates running for president have little national name recognition and lack the appearance of confidence. Americans want a leader who they know can do the job and leave no doubt in anyone’s mind that he or she know how to do it. Trump is that person.

America also needs a president who has actually accomplished extraordinary things other than being elected to public office.  The United States government is the largest bureaucracy in the world, employing more people than any other government, with a budget that dwarfs the finances of the largest corporations in the world.  If the primary role of the president of the United States is to be the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the country, then who among the candidates other then Donald Trump is best equipped to perform this function?  Nobody. Trump is generally believed to be one of the world’s most successful business owners.  As a CEO he is responsible for growing companies, delegating to individuals who have expertise in different areas, negotiating transactions and handling intense pressure.  These qualities provide the foundation for an excellent president.  Consider the fact that, despite the size of the United States economy, we have historically entrusted it to politicians who have never owned or operated a business. Trump, on the other hand, has experience running large businesses with international implications giving him a unique skill set unmatched by any other candidate.  Trump understands the importance of surrounding himself with experts in their fields to counsel and make important decisions because of his businessman background. Trump will surround himself with the most qualified individuals to solve our country’s problems without regard to political pressures.
Donald Trump is a successful businessman who speaks to the American people, exudes confidence, and is fit to be the president of the United States.

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Opinion: Paying it forward pays off

ALYSSA JPEGBY ALYSSA LEVIN

FEATURES COPY EDITOR

This past year, I experienced the most terrifying two hours of my life when I realized I had lost my wallet. Inside was my driver’s license, credit card, insurance card, house key, everything that helped me get through my daily life.

In a moment of forgetfulness, I had left it behind outside of my friend’s house, and my first thought was that I was never going to see it again. I was proven wrong when I returned home and found my wallet lying on the front porch of my house.

A wave of relief passed over me, followed quickly by a flood of appreciation. In addition to all of the important items in it, that wallet was given to me as a birthday present. It was a great feeling to know that whoever found it had the goodness to drive all the way to my house and return it with everything intact.

The two boys around the age of 10 who found my wallet came back the next day to make sure I had seen it on the porch. I thanked them for not just going out of their way to return my wallet, but for opening my eyes to the good of people and how we should all be acting

People are always quick to judge others, automatically thinking the worst. Most would think that the person who found the wallet would steal the credit card and the identity. The newspapers or news channels that post stories on the evils of people perpetuate this idea. Yet, here was my wallet, home safe and sound.

The fact that someone was good enough to return my wallet got me thinking that we all need to be better to each other, take the two minutes to go out of our way for someone else and pay it forward. This is not a new concept: a quick search on the Internet will tell you that the phrase was first used back in 317 BC in a small play. The phrase “you don’t pay love back, you pay it forward” then reappeared in 1916 in the book “In the Garden of Delight” by Lily Hardy Hammond.

In fact, there are others out there still trying to make “pay it forward” happen today, and that’s how all of us can get involved. April 30 is International Pay it Forward Day. The founder of the organization, Blake Beattie, lives in Australia and is aiming to inspire 3 million acts of kindness around the world. Last year, people from 70 different countries participated, whether it was from buying someone a cup of coffee or collecting books and distributing them to the less fortunate.

Paying it forward doesn’t have to be anything big. It can be something smaller such as holding the door open for someone or just simply smiling at a person who is looking down and asking him how his day is going. Just make it count.

That means all of us. If someone is walking in the parking lot with no umbrella while it’s raining, offer her one. If someone drops a backpack and everything spills out, stop and help him pick it up.

I guarantee that the feeling after will be rewarding.

To learn more about Pay it Forward Day visit www.payitforwardday.com. This website offers more about the day and ways that everyone can get involved.

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In my opinion: music festivals should not have age restrictions

ignacia JPEGBY IGNACIA ARAYA

Music festivals consist of much more than just sweaty, screaming, poorly dressed people. Being a fan of the music festival scene myself, I have witnessed it all, and while some argue that there should be an age limit for concerts, it seems to me that the atmosphere is just fine for a middle schooler who is seeking to enjoy a favorite DJ.

Some fail to realize that the music is actually the reason to attend, not the “party” or the “raging.” Music played at festivals ranges from computer-generated EDM to rap, to country. Some festivals that feature electronic music, such as Ultra Music Festival, Electronic Daisy Carnival, and Sunset Music Festival, have been putting age restrictions on entry. This forces those who are not of age to miss out on what could have been the best day/days of their lives.

The establishment of age-restriction policies means young fans must watch these festivals as videos when they are released on YouTube or in the form of live-streams. The supposedly safer atmosphere of watching from the comfort of one’s home eliminates middle schoolers from the crowd, and even those who are simply not yet 18, depending on the restrictions.

It is unfair that these fans are deprived of a rich cultural experience simply because they are not of age. Age restrictions are usually set to allow those that are ages 16+, 18+ or 21+ into the events. Setting an age restriction of 16+ is suitable; elementary schoolers might not be safe in these crowds but middle schoolers definitely are.

What this age restriction is basically implying is that the atmosphere of a music festival is not safe for an emerging teenager. But I disagree. Colorfully dressed people, good vibes and blasting music is more than suitable.

In September 2014, the Ultra Music Festival in Miami placed a new age restriction on entry to the event, only allowing those 18 and older to attend. This left out 17-year-olds, who are more than capable of surviving in a crowd full of sweaty, screaming ravers, as well as 16- and 15-year-olds.

Setting age restrictions gives a negative connotation to festivals, suggesting that the atmosphere might be dangerous for younger people. This is not the reputation music festivals should be have or be judged on since there is much more to it. Music festivals serve the sole purpose of bringing people together for music. This is what they are all about.

Music festivals have recently acquired this bad reputation of being prone to deaths among young people, but this is merely something that may occur anywhere else. One death in a festival, although tragic, shouldn’t stop thousands of younger fans from attending. There are other solutions to promoting safety at festivals. For example, eliminate dehydration by lowering of the price of water. Water fountain stations scattered throughout festivals could also be useful. Ultra charged $5 per water bottle last year. If this festival’s organizers really want a safer environment, affordable water is the least they can do.

The best days of my life have been at music festivals. The two times I’ve been lucky enough to attend these concerts, I was 16. I was there to enjoy the music and they were experiences I wish I could re-live once again but will be unable to next year because I am not yet 18. From a 16-year-old’s point of view, the atmosphere was safe. It might’ve gotten sweaty, but the crowd of positive energy was just fine.

Maybe it’s the provocative clothing worn by young girls, the flashy bracelets or the word “molly” that’s thrown around that can give electronic dance music festivals a bad reputation, but in reality, this genre of music is much more than that. There may be the festival-goers who are there for the illicit drugs, but there are also those that are there to enjoy the music. Electronic dance music is like no other genre. The music festival experience is indescribable and fans of all ages should be able to live it.

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Opinion: Sign me up

BY ANA BEATRIZ GONCALVES

We humans, as a race, are cyclic creatures, and nobody should ever break our routine, or they face our wrath. Unfortunately, closed doors seem to take the brunt of this abuse.

My friends and I have created a game thanks to the students here at the Bay: on days the Media Center is closed, how many people will disregard the sign that clearly says MEDIA CENTER IS CLOSED in the mornings and will still try to open the obviously locked door and stare at it frustrated until someone from a nearby picnic table says “Library’s closed.”IMG_0371

It gets more entertaining when the library is closed for the students but open for staff and faculty. Then, the students will walk into the unlocked library and will have to be escorted out of there by big, burly security guards.

This incredible phenomenon isn’t, however, limited to only the media center. Countless times, teachers will lock their rooms, post a sign outside telling their students that they’re either: a) not available during that period; or b) have moved the class to another room.

Students will try the door, sometimes pounding it and kicking it until a mysterious student, one with the ability to read, tells the others exactly what the sign says.

Now this may just be my opinion, but I think that when a teacher or faculty member posts a sign outside a door or a window, she means for the students to read it. I know, I know, that causes too much work. But don’t think of it like reading that assigned book from English class you hate, think of it as a text message, but on paper. And instead of sending it, the teacher put some Scotch tape on it and hung it up for all to see. So not exactly a text message, more like a group chat.

Even outside of high school, people ignore signs. Store says that its closed? Expect people to cup their eyes and try to peer in the darkened window. Even the Nicktoons show “Spongebob Squarepants” made a comment about this, having a customer knock on the closed doors and ask Squidward if they’re open. When the Squidward tells the customer to read the sign (which, spoiler alert, says CLOSED) the customer proceeds to place an order.

Bottom line: Read the sign and accept the fact that some people just don’t want you inside.

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