Opinion: College decision letters should be kept traditional

CAROLINA managingBY CAROLINA BOU

MANAGING EDITOR

On Dec. 16, 2015, I sat in Starbucks while studying for my government midterm anxiously awaiting my decision from my dream school, Boston College. The school released on Twitter that they would be delivering acceptance letters through email and as I saw the open tab on my computer change from “Inbox – 0” to “Inbox – 1,” I knew my future was here.

For the last four years, seniors have been preparing for college decisions nationwide and even worldwide. The college application process — which really begins freshman year — is stressful. All the work that we have completed, all the grades we received, and all the finals and midterms we take come to a decision we receive through an email or through an online status check. These results can be generated in seconds.

In a technological era, we are infatuated with the idea of getting our admissions decisions as fast as possible, rather than waiting. Back when my parents were applying to colleges 30 years ago, they had to wait for the admissions letter to come in the mail. Now when I receive my letter, while beautiful, it is not as special because I already checked my decision online.

Because online decisions have been more common, I do not know, and will never know, what it will be like finding my decision through a letter. I always have seen scenes in movies and television where high school seniors will open a letter with anticipation finding out whether they have been accepted or rejected from their dream school. While opening an email may not be as special as ripping open a letter from the mailbox, I’m sure my heart sank just as much as seniors’ hearts sank a couple years ago.

It is inevitable that college decisions will be released online now and in the next few years, and many schools have made this change. Boston College, for example, began emailing decisions this year. Up until last year, the school decided to stay traditional and send all admissions decisions through the mail. Vanderbilt University sent some regular decisions straight through the mail rather than through an online portal. State schools such as the University of Florida and Florida State University sent admissions decisions through an online portal saying “Congratulations! You have been accepted” with the rest of the information coming through the letter in weeks to come.

Online college decisions may not be as exciting, but a decision is still so. I have still been accepted to every single school I applied to so far. Each time, I jumped and screamed and cried just like any other high school senior would have regardless of where he or she saw the decision.

No matter how a decision is released, whether online, through email, or through the post office, an admission decision is something to be proud of — regardless of the result. Never will I forget the moment I opened up my PDF’d letter from Boston College saying, “I am delighted to offer you admission to Boston College,” and while I’m not going there, that feeling is one I will always remember.

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